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Louisiana’s COMPASS Teacher Eval System Still Down Following Statewide Cyberattack

UPDATE 11-25-19: CIS is once again operational.

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On Monday, November 18, 2019, Louisiana’s state office computer systems experienced a cyberattack. As a precaution, the state shut down those systems, with the expectation that computers in some offices would be back in operation the same day, and others, within days.

However, as of this writing (Thursday evening), Louisiana’s teacher evaluation system, the Compass Information System (CIS), is still not in operation.

The Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE) website is up, as is the la.gov email system. On November 21, 2019, at 4:52 a.m., LDOE curriculum supervisor, Jackie Bobbett, was able to send the following email to Louisiana’s curriculum review team regarding the cyberattack:

Please be advised that the LDOE has been affected by the cyber attack that began Monday. We apologize for any delays in responses.

We appreciate your patience during this time and will update you as we have more information.

LDOE Academic Content Team

In a November 19, 2019, update, the governor’s office did say it might take “several days” to restore service, and the November 21, 2019, Shreveport Times reports that Louisiana’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) is closed until Monday, November 25, 2019, and that according to Governor Edwards, “the ransomware attack was ‘largely unsuccessful’ because the state didn’t lose its data and didn’t pay a ransom.”

From the Office of the Governor, dated November 19, 2019:

“While it is nearly impossible to prevent all cyber attacks, because we have prioritized improving Louisiana’s cybersecurity capabilities, we were able to quickly neutralize the threat. The majority of the service interruption seen by employees and the public yesterday was due to our aggressive actions to combat the attack,” Commissioner of Administration Jay Dardenne said. “We are confident we did not have any lost data and we appreciate the public’s patience as we continue to bring services online over the next few days.”

Gov. Edwards prioritized increasing and improving cybersecurity capabilities in Louisiana, leading to the creation of Emergency Support Function 17, which is why Louisiana was able to quickly and aggressively respond to Monday’s attempted ransomware attack. Yesterday’s service interruption was largely due to the state Office of Technology Services’ aggressive response to prevent additional infection of state servers and not due to the attempted ransomware attack.

Online services and email started to come back online yesterday afternoon, though full service restoration may take several days.

OTS has confirmed that this attempted ransomware attack is similar to the ransomware targeted at local school districts and government entities across the country this summer. There is no anticipated data loss and the state did not pay a ransom. OTS staff continues to expand its security presence following the incident, both from systems and training perspectives.

Louisiana State Police and several federal agencies are investigating this attempted ransomware attack.

Louisiana’s ESF-17 team consists of leaders from OTS, the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security, LSP, the Louisiana National Guard, state university systems and other cybersecurity experts.

As of this writing, LDOE has not released a public statement regarding CIS and the November 18, 2019, cyberattack.

As for the governor’s office comparing the current attack to that which occured to several Louisiana school districts in the summer of 2019, LDOE offers this cyber incident Q & A presentation, including this slide detailing how that ransomware works:

As of July 30, four parish school systems have been affected by a cyber incident. This incident has inflicted a huge impact on IT resources and varying levels of data encryption and loss.

The Cybersecurity Response Team has identified the current cyber attack as the RYUK strain of ransomware. It is similar to another ransomware strain called HERMES.

This particular strain is delivered to its victims via links and emails.

RYUK operates in 2 steps – a dropper and an executable payload.

  • The dropper is the initial infection that creates a executable which triggers the actual attack.
  • Unfortunately the dropper is deleted when the initial infection installation is complete, so finding that original trigger is very difficult.

The Cybersecurity Response Team has identified that the initial triggers may have infected these school systems as far back as several months. These schools systems were actively monitoring and using tools for finding and fixing infections; however, this executable payload appears to have waited patiently to trigger its full attack at a later point in time versus immediately upon initial infection.

It is this delay that has brought about the phased network secure protocol the Cybersecurity Response Team is asking schools to implement immediately. We want schools to have the ability to block the secondary mechanism from executing and encrypting all data it can reach on the school’s network.

For more details on RYUK ransomware and how it works, see this Secure World Expo article, “Special Security Advisory: ‘Ryuk Ransomware Targeing Organzations Globally.'”

security breach

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Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.

Louisiana Federation for Children: Out-of-State Money Buys 26 Out of 30 Seats

Anyone who doubts that ueber-wealthy ed reformers are purchasing elections in other states need only consider this November 10, 2019, campaign finance report for the Louisiana Federation for Children (LFC) Action Fund PAC. Even so, as one quickly realizes when following ed reform money, the connections readily become numerous and complicated.

Let’s see how concise I can keep this this post centered on a single, LFC campaign finance report.

LFC is a state-level tentacle of the American Federation for Children (AFC), the school choice vehicle formerly chaired by US ed sec, Betsy DeVos. Louisiana gubernatorial challenger, Eddie Rispone is the former LFC chair. and also the former treasurer of the LFC Action Fund PAC.

According to LFC Action Fund PAC’s November 10, 2019, filing, three out-of-state donors (two individuals and one PAC), donated a combined $825K in October 2019. The same three donated a combined $2.6M in 2019 alone. They are Arkansas billonaire and Walmart heir, Jim Walton; California billionaire William Oberndorf, who succeeded DeVos as AFC chair, and a school choice PAC, Public School Allies:

  • William Oberndorf (CA): $275K in 10/19; $550K YTD (year to date).
  • Jim Walton (AR): $350K in 10/19; $912K YTD.
  • Public School Allies (VA): $200K in 10/19; $1.2M YTD.

Public School Allies lists as its address “6312 Seven Corners Center #354 Falls Church, VA 22044,” which is a UPS drop box. However, the October 24, 2019, Chalkbeat reports that Public School Allies is the “political arm” of the City Fund, created in 2018 to spread school choice by three individuals, including former New Schools for New Orleans (NSNO) CEO, Neerav Kingsland. From Chalkbeat:

The political arm of The City Fund, the organization with ambitions to spread charter schools and the “portfolio model” of school reform across the country, plans to spend $15 million to influence state and local elections over the next three years.

That political group, known as Public School Allies, has already directed money toward to school board races in Atlanta, Camden, Newark, and St. Louis, and state elections in Louisiana, Georgia, and New Jersey. Donations have ranged from $1 million to as little as $1,500.

The information was shared by Public School Allies and, in a number of cases, confirmed by campaign finance records. The $15 million comes from Netflix founder Reed Hastings and former hedge-fund manager John Arnold, the organization said.

According to his Linkedin bio, Kingsland worked for both Hastings and Arnold “leading education giving” immediately prior to establishing the City Fund.

Sure makes it read like the City Fund “belongs” to billionaires Hastings and Arnold.

But they are not alone. In 2018, billionaire Bill Gates gave the City Fund $10M “to increase the number of high-quality public schools in Oakland.” Of course, to the City Fund, a “public school” is a charter school.

Those complex ed-reform funding paths always seem to end with a few millionaires and billionaires, tossing their cash and puppeting the strings of American K12 education.

So, what, exactly, did Walton, Oberndorf, and those behind Public School Allies want to accomplish with the $829K they poured into Louisiana’s October 2019 election?

Well, they wanted to get 30 individuals elected into various offices, including both state house and senate, and, of course, Louisiana’s state ed board (BESE). To this end, they bought direct mail and digital media ads; “strategic consulting,” and paid for “media production.”

They ended up seating 26 of the 30.

Below is a listing of the LFC-supported candidates, as well as Party affiliation (R, D, or I) and whether each won or lost (W or L, respectively):

Louisiana House:

Louisiana Senate:

Louisiana BESE:

LFC Action Fund also did a $146K “media buy” to oppose one BESE candidate, Timmie Melancon (District 1) (I; L), and it spent $53K to oppose Ryan Gatti (SD 10) (R; L).

It takes an out-of-state village of billionaires to raise school choice.

desk money

___________________________________________________________________

Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.

John Bel Edwards Wins Second Term as Louisiana Governor

Democrat John Bel Edwards wins a second term as governor in deep-red, Republican Louisiana.

With 100% of precincts reporting, Edwards has 51.3% of the vote.

President Trump visited Louisiana three times in recent weeks to campaign for Republican gubernatorial challenger, Eddie Rispone.

As of this writing, Trump has been silent on Twitter regarding the Edwards win (Rispone loss).

Edwards’ win is critical for Louisiana’s infrastructure, including education, both K12 and postsecondary. Under Edwards’ leadership (see here also) in his first term (2016-2020), he fully funded Louisiana’s Taylor Opportunity Scholarship Program (TOPS); supported a state raise for teachers and other school personnel, and investing millions in early childhood education.

Rispone’s most notable connection to education is via US ed sec Betsy DeVos and her national, school-choice organization, American Federation for Children (AFC). Risponse is the former chair of the Louisiana branch of AFC, the Louisiana Federation for Children.

In his 2016 campaign, Edwards said he wanted to get rid of Louisiana state superintendent, John White. However, replacing White would involve a supermajority vote (8 out of 11 members) of the state ed board (BESE), which has been a market-based reform stronghold since out-of-state millions have been pumped into BESE elections beginning in 2011. The 2019 BESE election was no exception, with the lone runoff seat in BESE District 6 won by the ed-reform-favored candidate, Ronnie Morris. However, with Edwards in for a second term and lots of turnover in BESE, Edwards might have more leverage “behind the scenes” to move toward having BESE approve his choice of state superintendent.

We’ll have to see.

Even so, the reality is that any entity relying on funding from public money will surely fare better under Edwards than it would have under Jindal Rispone.

I wholeheartedly congratulate Louisiana governor, John Bel Edwards, on his second term.

jon bel edwards

John Bel Edwards

_________________________________________________________________________

Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.

How School Choice Works: The School Has the Choice to Close Mid-Year and Transfer Its Students

How school choice works:

  • Florida parents and students think they have chosen a charter school.
  • School decides to close mid-year. 
  • Parents and students are informed less than three weeks prior to closure that they will be transferred to another charter school.
  • Original, “chosen” school has apparently made arrangements to merge with a charter chain in the name of choosing a “different direction”– the details of which have yet to be disclosed.

More key details from WLRN, dated November 08, 2019:

Several students leaving LBA (Latin Builders Association) Academy on Thursday afternoon said they had been informed this week the school was shutting down and they were being transferred to the nearby charter school Mater Academy in Hialeah Gardens. …

A spokeswoman for Mater Academy confirmed there’s a “partnership” in the works between the South Florida charter school network and the LBA. …

Mater Academy is one of four prominent charter school networks affiliated with the South Miami for-profit educational service provider Academica. The Mater, Somerset, Pinecrest and Doral academy networks pay millions in taxpayer dollars annually to Academica for administrative services. Academica has close financial ties to several current and former state lawmakers who have crafted lucrative laws and budgets benefiting charter schools, which are publicly funded but privately run.

School choice empowers parents and students– right up to the inconvenient, unexpected moment it doesn’t.

house of cards

_______________________________________________________________________

Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.

La. Schools Graded F for 4+ Years Mostly Serve Low-Income Students of Color

On November 06, 2019, Louisiana’s 2019 school and district grades were made public.

To herald the occasion, the Baton Rouge Advocate published an article entitled, “44% of Louisiana Public Schools Need Major Improvements; 45K Students Attend F-Rated Schools.”

This headline comes one week after Louisiana’s 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and ACT scores were released.

The results were not pretty and do nothing to support the argument that corporate-styled, test-dependent ed reform works and serve as a blatant indictment of the Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE) led since 2012 by Louisiana’s ed-reformer-in-chief, superintendent John White.

According to the “F-Rated Schools” Advocate article, White says, “This can and must change.”

According to LDOE’s outdated page on “school redesign,” one can read the following nebulous info on “struggling schools and ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act)”:

ESSA PROGRESS TO DATE:

In 2017-2018, the first year under ESSA, 85 school systems submitted plans to improve their struggling schools to the state through the school redesign process, and as a result, school systems are implementing high-quality plans to improve 274 schools in 2018-2019.

Of course, if “school redesign” does not work, there are always warmed-over, No Child Left Behind (NCLB)-styled solutions, which include converting traditional public schools to charter schools:

Acting as the final intervention for schools that continue to struggle despite plans for redesign or comprehensive school system improvement strategies. Involvement by the RSD can include mergers, closures, or transformation by a charter operator.

If “transformation by a charter operator” actually worked, then 15 years following the creation of Louisiana’s Recovery School District (RSD) the former New Orleans RSD superintendent would not be writing a 2018 opinion piece stating that all-charter New Orleans needs “more good schools.”

Out of 66 New Orleans schools with A-F grades for 2019, 21 (32%) are graded D and 8 (12%) are graded F, compared to 14% D and 9% F statewide. These are the results of a state-run “recovery” that began in 2003 and kicked into high gear post-Katrina, in 2005.

The Advocate’s November 06, 2019, “F-Rated Schools” article mentions the following about Louisiana’s persistently F-rated schools and the non-solution of cycling these schools into a state-run “recovery” euphemism:

…89 [schools] that have received an “F” for two or more consecutive years and 25 that received an “F” for four or more consecutive years.

Those 25 are eligible for entry into the Recovery School District, which houses schools with persistent academic problems.

I was curious which exact schools were among the 25 referenced in the Advocate article; a public records request for the names yielded the following response:

In response to that request, the Department provides that the 2018-2019 School Performance Scores are available at the link provided below:

https://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/performance-scores

Please be advised that schools are eligible for the Recovery School District if they have been in Academically Unacceptable Status (AUS) for 4 or more years, as indicated in the file by the column, “2019 Academically Unacceptable Schools (AUS).” A value of AUS4, AUS5, or AUS6+ would indicate RSD eligibility. Note that there is a separate tab for alternative schools due to the different scoring formula.

Based on the above information, the following 26 (not 25) schools have received a F grade for four-plus years. Note that all are almost exclusively comprised of economically-disadvanteged students of color, except for the three virtual/online charter schools and one alternative school.

The following 12 schools have received F ratings for six or more consecutive years:

The following eight schools have received F ratings for five consecutive years:

And these six schools have received F ratings for four consecutive years:

What this list demonstrates is that the best way to escape the possible restructuring-merging-charter-conversion punishments of test-centric ed reform is to be white and moderately-monied– and to not attend an online charter school.

No predominately white, traditional public school is among these 26, four-plus-consecutively-F-graded schools.

But four online charters are.

They must not be *transformative* charters.

crcked road

_____________________________________________________________________

Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.

Kamala Harris’ Extended-School-Day, Childcare Legislation

US senator and Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris has introduced a bill to extend the elementary school day so that it better aligns with the traditonal, 9-to-5 workday in the name of helping low-income parents with child care.

The aim is to increase the length of the elementary school day “at least 8 am to 6 pm (or different hours if determined appropriate due to the needs of the community) Monday through Friday during the school year.” The bill would offer grants for up to $5M over five years to school districts to work the transformation. The bill also proposes support for summer programs (Harris proposes $1.3B annually for the summer programs.)

Harris’ bill does not require teachers to work longer school days. It does, however, presume that those elementary schools will be a stable, dependable, community presence. From the bill:

An elementary school at which Family Friendly School policies are established shall not close throughout the school year, except for on Federal holidays, weekends, and during weather emergencies and other emergencies that would make it a safety liability for children to be at school. Specifically, each elementary school at which Family Friendly School policies are established may not close for parent-teacher conferences, professional development, or for any other reason without offering full day enrichment activities free of charge for students.

And therein lies the disruptive-ed-reform rub.

Harris’ bill presumes that the associated elementary schools are a stable presence in low-income communities. Not so. America is well into the era of damning schools with low test grades to closure, and of turning commuity schools into “choice” schools (which means that the schools are not only less connected if not divorced from any community but also that they may well be operated by a remote, third-party entity from the community). So, to make low-income parents even more dependent upon elementary schools that could be shuttered for low test scores, or because a charter operator mismanages public funds, it a snowballed catastrophe in the making: If a school suddenly closes, not only are parents out of a school; they are also simultaneously out of a childcare option.

If Harris wants America’s elementary schools to offer child care, she should first introduce legislation to ensure that those schools will not be shuttered as casualties to market-based ed reform. A good start (indeed, a biggie) would involve killing the grading of schools using student test scores. Then should come assuring that the participating schools have a mechanism in place to answer to the public for any and all public money received, and excluding schools operated by third parties that are not directly accountable to the public (i.e., closed meetings and closed books).

Image result for kamala harris

Kamala Harris

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Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.

John White’s 2019 LA NAEP and ACT Failure

On October 30, 2019, the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) scores were made public.

After seven years of John White as Louisiana’s state superintendent, the results were so unsavory to White and his Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE) that his Louisiana 2019 NAEP Results Summary does not include a single actual NAEP scaled score.

Instead, the propagandistic flier advertises “change from 2017 to 2019” (differences in the actual scores that are intentionally excluded) and features “Louisiana ranks No. 1 in the nation for 2019 improvement in 8th grade math scale scores and proficiency rates” and “Louisiana’s pace of improvement since 2009 in all subjects significantly exceeds national trends.”

So, let’s look at Louisiana’s NAEP average scaled scores across time– not just from 2017 to 2019.

See these pages for Louisiana’s NAEP scores for grade 4 and grade 8.

Here are Louisiana’s actual average NAEP scaled scores across several NAEP administrations for math and reading, grades 4 and 8:

Grade 4 Math:

  • 2005: 230.23
  • 2007: 230.04
  • 2009: 229.43
  • 2011: 230.78
  • 2013: 231.37
  • 2015: 234.28
  • 2017: 228.97
  • 2019: 231.30

So, for grade 4 math, Louisiana’s 2019 average scaled score is almost 3 points lower than it was in 2015 and slightly lower than it was in 2013.

Grade 4 Reading:

  • 2005: 209.17
  • 2007: 207.41
  • 2009: 207.49
  • 2011: 210.41
  • 2013: 210.45
  • 2015: 216.20
  • 2017: 211.60
  • 2019: 209.87

As for grade 4 reading, Louisiana’s 2019 average scaled score is only .7 higher than it was in 2005– and 5.67 points lower than it was in 2015– and almost two points lower in 2019 than in 2017.

Grade 8 Math:

  • 2005: 267.76
  • 2007: 272.39
  • 2009: 272.38
  • 2011: 272.84
  • 2013: 272.76
  • 2015: 268.43
  • 2017: 266.51
  • 2019: 271.64

Now, White’s featured, 2019 grade 8 math ” number 1 improvement” only looks like improvement if one reads it with White’s proffered, 2017-to-2019 NAEP score blinders. However, one can see that from 2015 to 2017, Louisiana’s average grade 8 math score dropped almost two points. Moreover, the 2019 score is lower than the 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2016 grade 8 math scores.

This news is not good for White’s ed-reform public image. It if were, it would be featured in his LDOE press release.

Grade 8 Reading:

  • 2005: 252.69
  • 2007: 253.24
  • 2009: 253.33
  • 2011: 254.69
  • 2013: 257.35
  • 2015: 255.47
  • 2017: 256.75
  • 2019: 257.42

Louisiana’s grade 8 reading score is only .07 higher than it was in 2013, but the good news for LDOE propaganda is that the score dropped almost two points from 2013 to 2015 and did not recover by 2017, which helps with White’s 2017-to-2019 “improvement” narrative. (Highlight the recent “gain,” but don’t mention the loss preceding it.)

So there we have Louisiana’s 2019 NAEP marvels.

But there’s more.

On the same day that 2019 NAEP scores were released, so were Louisiana’s Class of 2019 ACT scores.

Louisiana’s Class of 2019 composite was 18.9— the lowest since all Lousiana graduates began to be required to take the test, beginning with the Class of 2013. In that year, Louisiana’s baseline composite was 19.5 (or 19.1, depending which LDOE info one reads).

Louisiana’s ACT Composite Scores (2013 – 2019):

  • 2013: 19.5 (or 19.1)
  • 2014: 19.2
  • 2015: 19.4
  • 2016: 19.5
  • 2017: 19.6
  • 2018: 19.3
  • 2019: 18.9

Not so surprisingly, White has no press release for Louisiana’s 2019 ACT dive.

That does not mean he has not been asked.

New Orleans Public Radio education reporter, Jess Clark, asked White to comment on Louisiana’s falling ACT score and received the following vague response, including NAEP-propaganda deflection:

Asked for comment on the latest ACT results, Louisiana State Superintendent John White sent an emailed statement pointing to progress the state made in 8th grade math on another national standardized test, the “Nation’s Report Card,” or NAEP.

“While the nation’s report card shows Louisiana tops the nation in 8th grade math progress, it’s important that we look at other indicators of our challenges,” he said.

John White wants to look at other indicators of “our” challenges.

I’ll bet he does.

John White and LDOE have no control over the reporting of NAEP scores and state-level ACT results– which means that these test scores are not susceptible to LDOE manipulation, and the results cannot be concealed from public view.

Therefore, NAEP and state-level ACT results provide the most objective measure of the test-score-centered ed reformers themselves– reformers like John White.

He is the head reformer in charge; for his reformer-success image, it all comes down to the test scores.

Louisiana’s 2019 NAEP and ACT results are a highly-visible, undeniable John White failure, and he knows it.

john white 2017

John White

____________________________________________________________________

Interested in scheduling Mercedes Schneider for a speaking engagement? Click here.

.

Want to read about the history of charter schools and vouchers?

School Choice: The End of Public Education? 

school choice cover  (Click image to enlarge)

Schneider is a southern Louisiana native, career teacher, trained researcher, and author of two other books: A Chronicle of Echoes: Who’s Who In the Implosion of American Public Education and Common Core Dilemma: Who Owns Our Schools?. You should buy these books. They’re great. No, really.

both books

Don’t care to buy from Amazon? Purchase my books from Powell’s City of Books instead.